Sunflower Seed Butter, 4 Ways

Sunflower seed butter in glass jar from above

With so many families needing to be peanut-free for school (and for allergies), I am so excited to share this recipe for Sunflower Seed Butter—in original, vanilla, cinnamon, and chocolate—as an affordable (and better tasting!) option to store-bought.

Sunflower seed butter in glass jar from above

Sunflower Seed Butter

I love the flavor of actual sunflower seeds, but I hate the flavor of store-bought sunflower seed butter…which led me to wonder if I could make a better-tasting and more cost effective version at home.

Turns out that, yes, sunflower seeds in butter form have a strong flavor, but it’s surprisingly easy to make and to customize to your flavor preference. And then it works in Sandwich Lunches, Sandwich Roll-Ups, or all sorts of other lunch ideas (and meals or snacks) for kids and adults.

This recipe comes together in about 15 minutes in a food processor, and it’s a peanut-safe option to send to schools as needed. (Just check the label on your seeds to make sure they were processed in a peanut-free facility.)

Ingredients You Need

To make this recipe, here’s what you need:

Sunflower seed butter ingredients on countertop
  • Roasted sunflower seeds: Choose hulled, unsalted seeds here. Roasted has better flavor than raw.
  • Sugar: This is optional for sweetness and it helps to balance the flavor of the seeds, which on its own is very strong. You can taste the blended seeds and decide whether or not to add it.
  • Salt: A pinch of salt also helps to balance the flavors.
  • Cinnamon, vanilla, or cocoa powder: You can add one (or a combo!) to all or a portion of your finished seed butter as a delish flavor variation.

Step-by-Step Instructions

Here’s how to make this recipe so you know what to expect. Scroll down to the end of this post for the full recipe.

sunflower seed butter in grid of 4 images
  1. Add the sunflower seeds to a wide pan set over medium heat. Toast briefly to release the oils.
  2. Transfer to the food processor.
  3. Grind on low until the seeds resemble the texture of coarse sand. Stop and scrape down the sides of the bowl with a spatula, then grind on high. As the seeds continue to be processed, they will release more and more oil and will eventually look like nut butter. It does take a few minutes, so be patient.
  4. Add the optional flavor enhancements as desired and blend. Transfer to a jar and store.

Frequently Asked Questions

What does sunflower butter taste like?

Sunflower seed butter tastes like an intense version of sunflower seeds. The flavor is very concentrated and slightly grassy.

Is sunflower seed butter healthier than peanut butter?

This nut-free spread is an allergy-friendly alternative to peanut butter and contains vitamin E, protein, and fiber.

What is sunflower seed butter made from?

Sunflower butter is made from ground up sunflower seeds. There is an option to add flavors such as cocoa, vanilla, or cinnamon.

Sunflower seed butter in ball jar with lid on countertop

Recipes to Make with Sunflower Butter

In addition to using in sandwiches and wraps, you can try this seed butter in the following recipes:

How to Store

Store in a jar or airtight container in the fridge for up to 2 months. Or you can freeze in a freezer bag or freezer-safe container for up to 6 months.

Best Tips for Success

  • Start with roasted, unsalted sunflower seeds that are hulled (or removed from the shell) for the best flavor.
  • Have patience when grinding in the food processor. It takes a few minutes for the seeds to break down.
  • Taste and adjust with the optional flavorings to your liking.
  • Freeze half of the batch for future weeks to keep it fresh.
  • Spread on bread, toast, a bagel, or use in baking or in recipes such as my Breakfast Bars, No-Bake Granola Bars, Energy Balls, or just swirl it into oatmeal.

Related Recipes


I’d love to hear your feedback on this recipe, so please comment and rate it below!

Sunflower seed butter in glass jar from above
  • Add the sunflower seeds to a wide pan set over medium heat. Toast for 6-8 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the seeds are fragrant and they start to give off some oil. (You could see the bottom of the pan look a little moist.)

  • Turn off the heat and let cool for a few minutes. Transfer to the food processor.

  • Grind on low until the seeds resemble the texture of coarse sand, or for about 3-4 minutes, stopping to scrape down the sides of the bowl with a spatula a few times.

  • Grind on high for 6-8 more minutes, stopping occasionally to scrape down the sides of the bowl. As the seeds continue to be processed, they will release more and more oil and will eventually look like nut butter. It does take a few minutes, so be patient.

  • Add the optional flavor enhancements as desired and pulse to combine or stir.

  • Transfer to a jar and store in the fridge for up to 2 months. Or you can freeze in a freezer bag or freezer-safe container for up to 6 months.

  • Store in a jar or airtight container in the fridge for up to 2 months. Or you can freeze in a freezer bag or freezer-safe container for up to 6 months.
  • Start with roasted, unsalted sunflower seeds that are hulled (or removed from the shell) for the best flavor.
  • Have patience when grinding in the food processor. It takes a few minutes for the seeds to break down.
  • Taste and adjust with the optional flavorings to your liking.
  • Freeze half of the batch for future weeks to keep it fresh.
  • Spread on bread, toast, a bagel, or use

Serving: 2tablespoons, Calories: 181kcal, Carbohydrates: 10g, Protein: 6g, Fat: 15g, Saturated Fat: 2g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 10g, Monounsaturated Fat: 2g, Trans Fat: 0.04g, Sodium: 226mg, Potassium: 137mg, Fiber: 3g, Sugar: 4g, Vitamin A: 3IU, Vitamin C: 0.3mg, Calcium: 25mg, Iron: 1mg



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